Strategies 101

Change Management: First, Stop Saying “Change”

Change Management: First, Stop Saying “Change”
By February 13, 2013 Strategies 101

“Change Management” is a necessary function with a terrible name. To most people, the word “change” itself is fraught with hidden meaning  — personal interpretations that can be negative and that can throw up roadblocks to successful adoption. Read more ›

7 Tips To Manage A Successful Online Reputation

7 Tips To Manage A Successful Online Reputation
By August 20, 2012 Strategies 101

What are people learning about you online? You have some control over it.

Are you startled when you search for your company’s name on Google? If you’re active on the internet, you’re probably more popular than you know. Which can be a double-edged sword.

Richard Young blog 081012 image 1Reputation management – monitoring the web for references to your company or brand – should be on your to-do list every day.

Start With Google, Naturally

You can learn in a few seconds what everyone sees on that critical first results page when you enter your company name.

Google offers tools to assist with reputation management. They’re accessible through the Google Dashboard, which you can open through any of the company’s online products, like Gmail, Google Calendar or Google Docs (soon to be Google Drive). To sign in, click here and enter your Google username and password.

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7 Tips To Punch Up Your Blog Content

7 Tips To Punch Up Your Blog Content
By June 18, 2012 Strategies 101

Blog floundering? Visitors dropping in but not staying around? Here are seven ways to revitalize your company’s online presence.

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Conflict And Community: Are You Prepared?

Conflict And Community: Are You Prepared?
By January 21, 2011 Strategies 101

street signLEADING THOUGHTS There are many types of communities: there are user forums and more permanent communities – some “walled” and some open. Blogs are absolutely living, breathing communities, where comment discussions are oftentimes more valuable than the content itself. There are also ad-hoc communities that result from people coming together to discuss something — picture a “tweetchat” that comes together to discuss something. These are all communities, and although they are different in formation process, duration, barriers to entry (signup, pay wall, professional qualifications), and other aspects — they are all built with a purpose of bringing people together who share an interest and passion. When passionate individuals get together and engage with each other, it’s like music to people like me. A shared passion inspires engagement, action, reaching goals, discussion, discourse… and conflict.

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Goal Setting Continued… Goal #2: Excellent Customer Experience

Goal Setting Continued… Goal #2: Excellent Customer Experience
By December 28, 2010 Strategies 101

smiley face LEADING THOUGHTS Welcome back! Last week, we wrote about the importance of goal setting for your engagement strategy, as it relates to social media in this particular example. What you do on the social web, just like any other business activity, can’t be haphazard. Social media is fun and exciting, and I fully understand the temptation of doing it for the sake of doing it. However, it’s a business activity, and you should approach it as such, with a plan for execution and measurement, metrics appropriate for your goals, and maybe even its own P&L.

Last week we talked about increasing awareness as a goal. If you don’t increase awareness, you won’t increase the number of unique users, and without that, you won’t grow your revenues (which is, or at least should be, your #1 goal). Sure, you could live off strong awareness for a while, getting everyone to try your product, maybe even buy it once. However, if your product doesn’t deliver what you promised it would, no one will want to repurchase or purchase after the trial runs out. There’s a word for that — hype. You don’t want to be one of those. You will risk turning off your loyal early brand champions, possibly resulting in bad word of mouth. For revenue to sustain and even happen at all, you need to tend to goal #2: customer experience.

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Benchmarking: If You Don’t Know Where You Are, How Will You Know Where You’re Going?

Benchmarking: If You Don’t Know Where You Are, How Will You Know Where You’re Going?
By December 16, 2010 Strategies 101

LEADING THOUGHTS In a recent post, we discussed the importance of tracking and listening to social media. As a follow-up, I’d like to take a stab at attacking measurement. Although both listening and measurement stem from tracking social media, there are differences between the two. In one of my articles for Mashable, I wrote about these differences. The short of the story is that the main difference is intent: for listening, the intent is to discover what people are saying in realtime and prioritizing for follow up. For measurement, however, the intent is to recap metrics, track performance over time and against competitors. In this post, I discuss the steps you can take to successfully measure social media. To recap, these steps are:

  1. 1) Have a goal
  2. 2) Align your team members, other teams, and leadership
  3. 3) Always consider context
  4. 4) Select platform wisely
  5. 5) Conduct a social media audit
  6. 6) Dig deeper
  7. 7) Do A/B testing

In this post, I want to address benchmarking, without which metrics is meaningless. Benchmarking provides the context that you need in order to make metrics meaningful. Imagine you start measuring social media, and you discover that you had 1,000 social media mentions in all channels. Now what? Is that good or bad? I have no idea! To really understand this, you need context. What’s customary for a product like yours? How much buzz is the product category garnering? How does it compare to your own performance? Let’s dig in and figure out what you should be benchmarking against.
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